Yariv Shavit

Yariv Shavit

Senior Application Engineer at Rohde & Schwarz

Coexistence of LTE & Radars

Abstract

Cellular networks, radar and other wireless systems are designed to obey a fixed spectrum assignment regulated by the FCC. These assignments are now being challenged, in that some bands are under-utilized, while others are highly over-utilized. This ineffectiveness in spectrum allocation is exacerbated by the dramatically increasing need for bandwidth in our RF infrastructure. In addition, state-of-the-art mobile radio standards claim more and more bandwidth. For example, the worldwide allocation of LTE bands increased from 11 to 48 bands since 2011. Issues like these have supported the evolution of intelligent systems such as cognitive radio. This presentation will discuss the coexistence between S-Band radars and the commercial LTE mobiles operating in E-UTRA Band 7 from where considerations to the future LTE technology by the DoD in close proximity to radars can be drawn. Coexistence issues examined by looking at measurement data gathered at a major international airport will be presented. Key performance indicators such as data throughput or Block Error Rate of the mobile LTE device and the probability of detection of security relevant radars have been measured and evaluated with the goal how to recognize and address the problems they cause.

About author

He has 17 years of industrial experience at Motorola, Emblaze Mobile, DSP Group, Philips Semiconductors and 9 years of experience as Senior Application Engineer for RF Devices at R&S Israel. He gathered a lot of experience in Interference and Coexistence test procedures for the Wireless Industry & Regulations.

Peter Vago

Peter Vago

Manager of European Systems Engineering at National Instruments

5G Challenge – From Concept to Reality

Abstract:

Recognizing the large amount of speculation regarding 5G networks, the world’s standardization bodies, including the 3GPP, have recently begun to transition concepts into reality. Not surprisingly, the vision painted by IMT-2020, the NGMN, and the 3GPP is expansive. 5G researchers now must build the framework that will redefine our very existence—from automobiles and transportation systems to manufacturing, energy, healthcare monitoring and more. To do this, researchers are adopting new design approaches to help with the challenging task of defining, developing, and deploying 5G technologies within a random access network. Most acknowledge that conventional approaches to vetting 5G technologies take too long and incur significant costs. Therefore, building a prototype and a proof of concept earlier in the process enables faster commercialization. Noting the importance of research-enabling testbeds, National Science Foundation Program Director Thyaga Nandagopal, said, “A viable prototype is increasingly the critical element to determining success or failure of a particular concept.“

About author

He is the Manager of European Systems Engineering that is the RF Center of Excellence of National Instruments in Europe. He studied broadband communications and graduated from Technical University of Budapest. Peter’s main focus areas are FPGA based RF applications, like channel scanning and monitoring, high-channel count digital receivers, channel emulation and cognitive radio.

Sergio Rapuano

Sergio Rapuano

IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society,
Associate professor, Department of Engineering, University of Sannio

Analog-to-Information Converters: research trends and open problems

Abstract:

Recently, a new sampling paradigm, called Compressive Sampling (CS) has been proposed, in order to exploit the sparse representation that many natural signals exhibit. High-speed data acquisition is becoming a relevant topic in advanced applications, such as high-speed radar and communications, signal analysis, high-speed video acquisition, and so on. CS has been proposed to face the challenge of high speed acquisition where signals to be acquired are compressible. Analog-to-Information Converters (AICs) represent the implementation of the CS concept in practice. An AIC is a device that takes as input an analog signal and, unlike traditional ADCs, gives as output a digitized and compressed version of the input. In the literature, some AIC architectures have been proposed. Although the topic is relatively new several efforts have been made in the research community to propose AIC architectures and schemes. In order to identify the possible future application scenarios of such devices their characterization and standardization issues need to be analyzed too. The talk will deal with: (i) introduction of the compressed sensing, (ii) basic information about Analog-to-Information Converters, (iii) overview of the main applications of AICs and their current implementations, (iv) presentation of the research trends and some open issues about AICs focusing on their characterization and standardization.

About author

He is Associate Professor of Electric and Electronic Measurement at the Department of Engineering of the University of Sannio. He is senior member of the IEEE, member of the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society, the Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society and the Standards Association. In particular, within the Instrumentation and Measurement Society he is: Chapter Chair liaison; member of the “Waveform Generation, Measurement and Analysis” Technical Committee (TC-10), chairing the Subcommittee on Jitter Measurement; member of the Technical Committee on “Education for Instrumentation and Measurement” (TC-23); secretary of the Technical Committee on “Medical and Biological Measurements” (TC-25) and vice-chairman of the TC25 Subcommittee on Objective Blood Pressure Measurement. He participated the realization of three IEEE standards and is currently working at two new standards. Within the Italian Society of Electric and Electronic Measurement (GMEE) Sergio Rapuano is the chairman of the Education Committee. Since 2003 he participated in the organisation of several international scientific conferences in the field of electronic measurement: the IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technical Conferences, the International Measurement Confederation (IMEKO) TC-4 Symposia, the IEEE International Workshops on Medical Measurements and Applications, the IMEKO International Workshops on Analog to Digital Converters Modelling and Testing, playing different roles: session chairman, member of the technical program committee, technical program chairman, general chairman. He published more than 150 papers in international journals and in national and international conference proceedings on the following subjects: ADC and DAC modelling and testing, digital signal processing, distributed measurement systems, medical measurement and has been guest editor of the following journals: IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, Measurement, Computer Standards and Interfaces, Acta IMEKO and International Journal of Advanced Media and Communications. He received the Outstanding Young Engineer Award 2007 from the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society.

Martin Donoval

Martin Donoval

R&D projects coordinator, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

Wearable healthcare electronics for 24-7 monitoring with focus on user comfort

Abstract

Human health is important for people in any age. Healthcare addresses a market of more than 10% of the European gross domestic product. An ageing population will have an enormous impact on society and the economy. Today, 20.5% of the EU population is 65 or over; in 2030, 28.7% will have reached that age. Without significantly increasing costs, the healthcare system is now hardly able to guarantee an adequate level of care. By 2030, this will be impossible without dramatic changes. Bioelectronics is an important R&D field with significant impact on human health. New monitoring devices and sensing methods, new algorithms and machine learning and latest opportunities in computing power of smart-devices provide a strong base for enhanced daily healthcare. Together with the latest technologies there are new materials and sensors, suitable for implementation in mobile healthcare assistance devices. The objective of this article is to provide a view of some latest research innovations in field of bioelectronics. Among these a short description of non-invasive hydration sensor, glucose sensor, hemodynamic sensor preparation and implementation methods is provided followed by a proposal of a design of flexible plaster for ECG monitoring in function of a heart holter. The sensor units are designed to be used as implanted of non-invasive sensors with connection to the skin. A design of a remote sensing units require consideration of several functional blocs with following integration and evaluation phase. For the integration of such system several functional blocks are needed for the preparation of medical smart system cluster, such as energy source or harvester with supercaps or battery, communication (integrated antennas), new organic materials or biocompatible housing. Reliability aspects and size restrictions are extremely critical for medical, especially implantable smart systems. The design should provide high convenience of use at all-day monitoring without any cables and hard parts, causing user discomfort. Preparation of such system is deeper described by the example of an ECG plaster holter.

About author

He works as R&D projects coordinator in area of medical electronics, organic electronics and smart systems. He is a member of research group, focused on new organic materials, organic sensors elements design and integration of new devices into smart-systems. Meanwhile he is a director of R&D projects department of Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava with over 8 years experiences with research projects preparation and implementation. Based on previous experiences he participates in implementation of new prototypes and dedicated electronics for specialized systems to the practice. As a co-founder of several spin-offs he fully understands the need for technology transfer between the university level and the market. He finished his master and PhD theses at Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava.